Ellie herself has significant experience in leading people. She also has three kids. And a part time job. She leads the way for many people in how to balance what I like to call “work-work” balance — a very real experience for many coaches who are new to setting up a coaching business — or who have been established for years — AND have to work another job to pay bills or for mental health / joy / creativity / balance reasons.

When we came across Tad Hargrave, we realised that he was a kindred spirit. He describes himself as “a hippy who developed a knack for marketing (and then learned to be a hippy again).” We very much share Tad’s view that marketing can make you feel good, can be ethical and “conscious”. And If you think “Hippy” here means doing fluffy and unchallenging marketing, think again…

Faced with marketing your coaching, you can always decide to sell it just like any other product. But you really shouldn’t. Tempting though it may be… It can feel like hard work trying to convince someone that they ‘need’ coaching, trying to persuade them of how much better their lives would be if they could just see what you can see so clearly. So how can you get someone to point where they’re ready to talk about coaching?

A lot of marketing advice is complicated. There’s talk of funnels, conversions, CRM and CTAs… This doesn’t feel right for a lot of coaches so they often skip the strategy and go straight to the tactics bit. And that’s understandable. A strategy sounds complicated, and all that jargon! It’s tempting to choose a marketing tactic and go – at least you feel like you’re doing something. But that can be a) counterproductive, and b) unnecessary.

Coaches often want fast results and turn to marketing to get them. However, for fast results, marketing isn’t the right tool for the job. There are a lot of people who will argue that it is. And the same people are often happy to take your money to help you get these fast results. The results they’re offering are traffic, clicks or ‘engagement’. But does this really translate to new clients? And if the ‘result’ (fast or otherwise) or your marketing isn’t a new client, is it really a result?

When coaches try to attract new clients they often talk too much about the wrong things. What seems important, relevant and obvious to coaches is often not what the client is ready, or wanting, to engage with. This is why marketing can feel ‘salesey’ or like a lot of hard work. A simple shift from selling what you do to telling people what you do can make your marketing more effective and a lot easier.

We’re often told to say ‘no’ more often – from life coaches to productivity experts, there’s no shortage of people telling us that ‘no’ is a good answer to give. But it’s not always a good answer to get… not when you and your business are looking for a ‘yes’. So how can you get more clients to say “Yes”?